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Graduate Music Degree & Certificate Programs

 

Click to read: Music Student Handbook

MASTER OF MUSIC (M.M.) DEGREE

CONCENTRATIONS: Chamber Music, Composition, Conducting, Electronic Music, Jazz Studies, Music Performance, Music Theory (not active at this time), and Piano Pedagogy

 

Perhaps the most compelling reason to study music at the University of South Florida is the opportunity to work with our superb music faculty. These gifted, dedicated artists/scholars are among the preeminent leaders in their fields and have been carefully chosen for their professional training, excellence in musical performance and research, and pedagogical expertise. They are featured on many professional recordings and appear in prestigious concert venues around the world. Their compositions are premiered globally. Their scholarship is published in the leading research journals, books, and monographs in their disciplines. The School of Music also invites guest composers, conductors, and performing musicians to enhance its performances and to provide master classes, symposia, and clinics for students and the public. Many USF music alumni are currently performers in a variety of concert settings and successful teachers in public schools, colleges, and universities around the country in a variety of concert settings.

 

The School of Music at USF offers the student the opportunity to study with distinguished faculty and to be in the company of other superior music students for an exciting and exacting period of study. The Master of Music degree provides students with an opportunity to pursue intense, focused study in their music specialty, coupled with a vigorous, balanced curriculum in music theory, music literature, and electives. Students in this program are mentored expertly by senior faculty and exhibit mastery of their specialty at the end of the course of study by way of appropriate capstone experiences, including recitals or theses and comprehensive examinations. The provisions and balance of these experiences comport precisely with the curriculum guidelines required by the National Association of Schools of Music.

 

Complete admission and curricular information about the Master of Music degree and its concentrations is available at: http://www.grad.usf.edu/catalog.php.

AUDITIONS are required for the following concentrations in the MM degree.Please apply on the School of Music website: http://music.arts.usf.edu.Click on Prospective Students for information and the application form.

 

NASM Table of Music Courses for MM in Chamber Music

NASM Table of Music Courses for MM in Choral Conducting

NASM Table of Music Courses for MM in Instrumental Conducting

NASM Table of Music Courses for MM in Jazz Performance

NASM Table of Music Courses for MM in Performance

NASM Table of Music Courses for MM in Piano Pedagogy

 

MM in Choral Conducting

Before an on-campus audition in choral conducting can happen, you will need to send a DVD with conducting footage of rehearsal and performance. After Dr. Jason Dungee, our director of choral studies, reviews the DVD, you may or may not be required for an on campus audition, depending on the quality of the DVD footage. Any on-campus auditions for conductors will occur during a weekday when the USF choirs are regularly meeting. Final admission decisions will be made by March 15th.

Mail your DVD via postal service to:

Dr. William P. Hayden

Music Admissions

School of Music

University of South Florida

4202 East Fowler Ave., MUS 101

Tampa, FL 33620

 

MM in Instrumental Conducting

Inquiries for instrumental conducting should be directed to Dr. John Carmichael at jcarmich@usf.edu.Please specify if you are interested in wind band or orchestral conducting.The degree requires 34 credit hours: Instrumental.Conducting.pdf

PORTFOLIOS: Composition & Jazz Composition

 

MM in Jazz Composition

NASM Table of Music Courses for MM in Jazz Composition

Contact Prof. Chuck Owen for details.

 

MM in Composition and Electro-acoustic Music

NASM Table of Music Courses for MM in Composition

NASM Table of Music Courses for MM in Electro-acoustic Music

Contact Prof. Paul Reller or Dr. Baljinder Sekhon for details.

 

Applicants for graduate composition and/or electro-acoustic study must submit a composition portfolio for review by the composition faculty. Scores must be included for each work (unless irrelevant); recordings of each work should be included when available (MIDI realizations are also helpful), but are not required. If possible at least one work should be an electronic work.For electronic works, a two paragraph description of the software used and compositional techniques employed can substitute for a score.

Composition Portfolio Checklist:

†††††††† 3-5 Current Scores (with optional recordings)

†††††††† List of works and performances

†††††††† Biography describing your experience as a musician/composer

 

Materials should be submitted online.

Applicants for graduate and undergraduate composition study must submit a composition portfolio for review by the composition faculty. Scores must be included for each work (unless irrelevant); recordings of each work should be included when available (midi realizations are also helpful), but are not required. If possible at least one work should an electronic work.  For electronic works, a two paragraph description of the software used and compositional techniques employed can substitute for a score.

Applicants for undergraduate composition must also audition for the appropriate applied faculty since two years of performance study are required for the undergraduate composition degree. Refer to the appropriate requirements for the performance area(s) of your choice.

Applicants must also arrange for an interview with the Composition faculty (by phone or email). For undergraduate applicants this should take place during your performance audition date; for graduate applicants, this interview maybe done in person (when possible), Skype, or by phone.

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION

The School of Music website provides an electronic evaluation/recommendation form under PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS, which can be used for all bachelor degree students and all MM degree students.

 

All letters of recommendation for MA (music education) and PhD students can be sent as emails to Dr. C. Victor Fung, at fung@usf.edu.They will be forwarded to the appropriate faculty members.

INTERVIEWS: PHD IN MUSIC EDUCATION

One of the admission requirements for the Ph.D. degree program in music education is an interview with the music education faculty.Please contact Dr. C. Victor Fung, director of the Ph.D. program, at fung@usf.edu.


GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS

Graduate assistantship applications are made on the School of Music website.The Associate Director of the School of Music, Dr. David Williams, supervises the award process and the duty assignments.Preliminary considerations regarding these awards can be discussed with the major professor of the studentís degree program.

DOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS

Doctoral fellowships are awarded by the music education faculty on a very selective basis.Inquiries should be addressed to Dr. C. Victor Fung, director of the Ph.D. degree program in music education.


MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.) IN MUSIC EDUCATION

 

What does learner-centered mean?

 

The learner-centered classroom includes significant time for students to work in small groups where they contend and struggle with the messy work of musical problem solving. Students also have extensive control and autonomy over their work making musical and creative decisions and determining which musical styles to study and which musical instruments are best for those styles. In this classroom the teacher has several roles which include developing assignments, providing skill instruction, supervising, making recommendations, observing, answering questions, advising, assessing, and generally Ďjust being thereí for when they are needed.

 

The learner-centered MUSIC classroom will often involve students working collaboratively within small groups, and across the class, making musical decisions both covering and performing previously composed material and creating their own original pieces, while engaging in musical problem solving. They would also have opportunities to reflect on, analyze and critique their work.

 

How does USFís MA in Music Education relate?

 

Our degree program is focused on developing teachers that are equipped to help students excel in a learner-centered classroom. Whether you are new to this pedagogical concept or have been teaching in a learner-centered environment for some time, you will expand your teaching expertise in ways that will help you reach a more diverse set of students and enable your students to develop musical skills they will be able to use throughout their lives.

 

Why the focus on research?

 

During degree study you will develop into a proficient action researcher. This will enhance your teaching in two ways. First, you will learn how to read and interpret previous research with the learner-centered classroom that can have significant influence on your teaching methods in the classroom, and second you will be capable of applying action research to help you better evaluate the effectiveness of your learner-centered methods. By the end of your program the final project should be ready to submit for publication in an appropriate professional journal so that you might help other teachers understand learner-centered techniques.

 

What happens during the one week on-campus experience?

 

The first course you take in the degree program, Learner-Centered Approaches in Music Education (six credit hours), is divided into three sections. The first is a seven week on-line session that will introduce concepts and research concerning learner-centered pedagogical techniques. It will also involve theories of pop/rock music. Following this is one week (Monday-Saturday) of intense on-campus work where you will put into practice everything that was covered during the first seven weeks. You will spend a good deal of this week in small, learner-centered groups, solving musical problems by covering songs and creating new material. You will learn techniques in recording, mixing, and producing and you will have opportunities to experiment with a wide range of electronic and digital musical instruments. You will have fun, you will laugh, and you will learn a lot about implementing learner-centered approaches in your own teaching. As a follow-up to this on-campus experience you will spend one week reflecting on all the previous work with your fellow classmates. Note that on-campus expenses, including housing and meals are included in the regular tuition charge (excludes travel to/from Tampa).

 

How long will it take me to finish the degree requirements?

 

While there are many possible variations based on individual needs, there are two basic routes for taking the required 30 credit hours to complete the degree:

 

The Standard Route

 

        Summer 1: Learner-Centered Approaches in Music Education I (6 credit hours)

        Fall/Spring 1: History of Blues and Rock and one elective course (6 credit hours)

        Summer 2: Research Design and Literature Review (6 credit hours) (You could also consider a four-week summer internship working in schools in and around London, England as an elective option)

        Fall/Spring 2: One elective course (3 credit hours) (You will also be completing a thorough literature review for your own learner-centered research topic)

        Summer 3: Research Data Collection and Report Writing (6 credit hours)

        Fall/Spring 3: Run your personal learner-centered research project and complete the written report

        Summer 4: Learner-Centered Approaches in Music Education II (3 credit hours)

 

The Faster Route (available beginning Summer 2017)

 

        Summer 1: Learner-Centered Approaches in Music Education I, Research Design and Literature Review (12 credit hours)

        Fall/Spring 1: History of Blues and Rock, and two elective courses (9 credit hours) (You will also be completing a thorough literature review for your own learner-centered research topic)

        Summer 2: Research Data Collection and Report Writing (6 credit hours)

        Fall/Spring 2: Run your personal learner-centered research project and complete the written report

        Summer 3: Learner-Centered Approaches in Music Education II (3 credit hours)

 

Here is an outline of the new curriculum to begin in Summer 2016:

Curriculum for MA in Music Education

 

NASM Table of Music Courses for MA in Music Education

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (Ph.D.) IN MUSIC EDUCATION

The Doctor of Philosophy in Music Education is the terminal degree in our field. At the University of South Florida, this program is intended for the aspiring pinnacle leader in music education research, teaching, and administration. The curriculum prepares the student to engage in original research in music education and related fields (arts education, music technology, music psychology, etc.). In coordination with faculty mentors, the student has great flexibility in designing a program that fits his/her interests and strengths. Admission requirements include an interview with the music education faculty and the submission of writing samples and GRE scores. A limited number of fellowships and scholarships are available to outstanding students.

 

Complete admission and curricular information about the Doctor of Philosophy degree in music with a concentration in music education is available at:

http://www.grad.usf.edu/catalog.php.

 

NASM Table of Courses for Ph.D. in Music Education

GRADUATE CERTIFICATES

Graduate Certificates are available as post-baccalaureate and post-masterís non-degree-seeking programs.The post-bachelorís Graduate Certificate requires a minimum of 12 credit hours in related courses, such as performance with studio and ensemble courses.A major professor will supervise the certificate program, including a capstone experience, such as a recital.The post-masterís Advanced Graduate Certificate is the same, except that 15 credit hours are required.

 

Successful auditions and/or portfolio reviews are required for admission.Music education is the only field that does not offer graduate certificates.Students should be aware that financial aid is usually not available for certificate programs, as they are considered to be non-degree-seeking.